External Advert

The following posts have been advertised on TES and our website

Tutors for Science (all specialisms)
Full time, Permanent to commence 21st August 2018.

We are looking to appoint enthusiastic and committed Science Teachers to join our growing team delivering BTEC Level 3 Science. You may also have the opportunity to contribute to A level in your Science specialism. This post is suitable both for experienced teachers or newly qualified teachers.

The salary for the above post is points 1-9 on the Sixth Form College teaching pay spine currently £23,396-£38,748 per annum.

Advert Closing Date: 12 noon Monday 23rd April 2018
Interviews Date: w/c 30th April 2018

Tutors for Health and Social Care
Full time, Permanent to commence 21st August 2018.

We are looking to appoint enthusiastic and committed Health and Social Care teachers to teach BTEC Health and Social Care. This post is suitable both for experienced teachers or newly qualified teachers.

The salary for the above post is points 1-9 on the Sixth Form College teaching pay spine currently £23,396-£38,748 per annum.

Advert Closing Date: 12 noon Monday 23rd April 2018
Interviews Date: Friday 27th April or w/c 30th April 2018

Back to top


External oral examinations from John Page

Colleagues should be aware that external oral examinations will be taking part in rooms adjacent to the languages corridor as follows;-

  •  23rd, 24th & 25th April: French
  • 1st, 15th & 17th May: Spanish
  • 8th May: German

Colleagues are asked to be mindful of these and to expect students studying languages to be absent at these times. Thank you.

John Page

Back to top


New Quiet Study Space from Corinne Walker

There are a couple of new quiet study areas available for students to use from 16/4.

Quiet Study Area (Rm 41)

College 1/Main Building now had a new quiet study space available, located in rm 41, which was the old main reception area, by the main staircase.

Quiet Study Area – KnowZone2 (DLB Café area)

A further quiet study area has been created at the back of the DLB café area. This is for students wishing to study only. Students wanting to socialise should move to other buildings. The DLB café is not a social area and students should eat their food then leave the area, to free up space for other students. Expect to be challenged if you are socialising in this area.

Thanks

Corinne

Back to top


External advert

The following has been advertised on the greater jobs and our website.

Progress Tutors
36 hrs 40 mins per week Mon – Fri, (8.40am – 5.00pm) 40 weeks per year (hours per week may vary from time to time to meet the requirements of the job, for example at enrolment and during admissions interviews), to commence 21st August 2018, fixed term until 22nd August 2019.

Salary: pro rata of points 22 – 25 of the Sixth Form College’s Support Staff pay spine, currently £18,494 – £20,458pa.

The College is looking to recruit into its Progress Tutor team. This role is ideal for someone very interested in working with young people and possibly hoping to teach in the future. As a Progress Tutor you will be responsible for overseeing the progress of a caseload of students, the delivery of group tutorials and providing outstanding individualised pastoral support and advice and guidance. You will be expected to agree and monitor targets for students based around achievement, retention, attendance and progression and develop resources that will help to enable young people to succeed and progress. You will also be responsible for writing references for students to support their progression.

The successful candidates will be articulate with great attention to detail. You must have the ability to remain calm under pressure coupled with the capacity to work to tight deadlines efficiently and manage a large caseload. Self-motivated, you will expected to be a good team player with strong IT skills. Essential is your ability to work with young people, providing them with the very best experience. Progress Tutors will be expected to work flexibly to ensure that the responsibilities of the role are fulfilled effectively. You will be part of a vibrant, enthusiastic and friendly team. It is desirable that you will be a graduate.

Advert Closing Date: 12 noon 26th April 2018
Interview Date: w/c 30th April 2018

Back to top


Free envelopes

We have had a huge clear out of our store cupboard. We have put box upon box of envelopes in the staff room, free to a good home! They are mainly white A4 windowed envelopes but there are some others too. The seal isn’t sticky anymore, but that’s nothing a bit of cellotape or glue can’t fix. Some have been in storage since 2008. Feel free to take as many as you want.
Student Services
🙂

 

Back to top


Briefing notes 2018.03.28 from Dee Campbell

Briefing 2018.03.28

Back to top


Sports Relief Fundraising total from Richard Lee

Big thank you to staff and students for all their efforts & contributions

A total of £440 was raised!

Back to top


The Know staff questionnaire from Rosemary Broadbent

Please could I ask any staff who have not yet done The Know staff questionnaire, to do so by Thursday 29thMarch.

Thank you to all staff who have returned theirs already.

Rosemary

Back to top


Leavers Table 12.03.18 to 19.03.18 from Gillian Oakley

Leavers Table 12.03.18 to 19.03.18

Back to top


Top Teaching Tip of the Week from Julie Maher

Praise has its place in any lesson, but using it too much or when it’s not deserved can be demotivating. Here’s some quick wins on how to motivate your students:

  • Moving towards more specific praise will help students become more reflective about their learning; they recognise that if they mirror this specific positive feedback later they will improve the quality of their work.
  • If we want to inspire our students to believe they can achieve more, we cannot afford to praise them cheaply. “To motivate students – especially older students who are more discerning and better able to appreciate the differences between what is said and what is meant – teachers need to avoid praise that is not truthful … or has not been earned,” writes Daniel T Willingham, professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Virginia.
  • Praise for good behaviour can prevent the negativity that often dominates in more challenging groups, and instead celebrates a positive classroom culture.
  • Effective praise must also be spontaneous, not an after-thought. Using it when young people least expect it, and communicating genuine enthusiasm about the quality of work they have demonstrated can result in a change of energy in lessons.
  • It’s not just students who can benefit from better praise; we should also think about validating the challenging work we do as teachers. Stepping outside of our classrooms, noticing the brilliant things our colleagues are doing, and meaningfully praising others should help both us and our students achieve more.

 

Back to top